Category Archives: Sculpture

July 18

Postwar Expressionist Sculpture: Kenneth Armitage

On the 18th of July 1916, sculptor William Kenneth Armitage was born in Leeds, England. He is remembered for producing semi-abstract works, still recognizably human, but sometimes merging into animal, organic or non-organic forms. Armitage’s mature style emerged in 1952 and reached its peak in 1958, when he won best international sculptor under age 45 at […]

April 17

‘Being an Artist is a state of mind’: Louise Nevelson’s Creative Drive

On the 17th of April 1988, American sculptor Louise Nevelson died in New York. Regarded as one of the most significant figures of 20th-century American sculpture, she serves as an example of incredible persistence in fulfilling one’s personal ambition. Born to Jewish parents in Tsarist Russia in 1899, at the age of six she moved […]

April 12

Jim Gary’s Junk Yard Animals

On the 12th of April 1990, Jim Gary (1939 – 2006) opened his exhibition Twentieth Century Dinosaurs at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. Gary was the only sculptor ever invited to present a solo exhibition at the prestigious museum; he became known for his large, colourful creations of dinosaurs […]

March 27

Pablo Picasso and Julio Gonzalez: The Power of Collaboration

On the 27th of March 1942, Spanish sculptor and painter Julio Gonzalez died in Arcueil, France. He is mostly known for his abstract iron sculptures with strong cubist influences. Although involved in various artistic enterprises since early youth, first as a metalsmith and jeweller at his father’s workshop, then as a painter in Paris, he did […]

December 08

The Passions of Camille Claudel: Sculptor, Woman

On the 8th of December 1864, Camille Claudel was born in Fère-en-Tardenois, Aisne, northern France. As a teenager, Claudel was determined to make it as an artist in Paris, so she convinced her parents to fund her studies at the Academie Colarossi. Here, she met Rodin who was filling in for her teacher Boucher. Very […]

November 17

Deviation and Art: The Eric Gill Case

The urine of the stallion fertilises the fields more than all the chemicals of science. So, under Divine Providence, the excess of amorous nature fertilises the spiritual field. (Eric Gill) On the 17th of November 1940, British artist Eric Gill died of lung cancer in Hillingdon, UK. During his lifetime he was recognised for his […]

November 10

The Lewd, the Crude and the Ugly: Epstein’s Sculpture

On the 10th of November 1880, sculptor Jacob Epstein was born in New York, yet he is best known as an English artist, having settled in Britain in 1905. As a Jewish American in Edwardian London working in a rough, stylised modernist manner, the critical reception of his work was far from friendly. Epstein has […]