Category Archives: Feminism

April 17

‘Being an Artist is a state of mind’: Louise Nevelson’s Creative Drive

On the 17th of April 1988, American sculptor Louise Nevelson died in New York. Regarded as one of the most significant figures of 20th-century American sculpture, she serves as an example of incredible persistence in fulfilling one’s personal ambition. Born to Jewish parents in Tsarist Russia in 1899, at the age of six she moved […]

April 16

Adler’s Bordello: Jewish Female Paths in America

On the 16th of April 1900, Pearl (Polly) Adler was born in Ivanava (Yanow), Belarus, as the oldest of 9 siblings in a traditional Jewish family. When she was 12, her father, a successful travelling tailor, decided to send her ahead as the first link in the Russian “chain emigration” to the United States to […]

March 28

The Elusion of Happiness in Viginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway

On the 28th of March 1941, English writer Virginia Woolf filled her pockets with stones and drowned herself in the River Ouse, near Lewes, East Sussex during a bout of severe depression. Her entire life revolved around the fruitless chase of inner peace and happiness which she fervently pursued through the creative act of writing. […]

March 18

Male Narcissism vs. Female Desire in M-me Fayette’s Princesse de Clèves

On the 18th of March 1634, French writer Marie-Madeleine Pioche de La Vergne, comtesse de La Fayette, was born (or according to some records) baptized in Paris. She was the author of La Princesse de Clèves, France’s first documented historical novel. Published anonymously in March 1678, the story is considered rather modern for its penchant […]

March 16

The Matriarchal Reign of Artist Rosa Bonheur

On the 16th of March 1822, French painter and sculptor Marie-Rosalie Bonheur was born in Bordeaux, Gironde, as the oldest child in a family of artists. A feisty, ambitious woman, Bonheur achieved more than most of her female contemporaries could ever dream of. During a time when the Napoleonic Codes limited French women to access […]

March 09

Furs and Female Domination in Sacher-Masoch’s Writing’s

On the 9th of March 1895, the Austrian writer and journalist Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (the term ‘masochism’ is derived from his name) died in Lindheim, the German Empire; although, there is some discrepant information about him having died in an insane asylum in Mannheim in 1906. Leading his life on the verge of reality […]

March 08

Anne Bonny, Eighteenth-Century Pirate Vixen

On the 8th of March 1702, notorious Irish female pirate Anne Bonny was born as Anne Cormac, in Kinsale County Cork, the daughter of a servant woman and her solicitor employer. Trustworthy information about her life is scarce, mostly relying on A General History of the Pyrates. The book was written in 1724 and signed […]

March 04

Karolina Widerström: at the Frontiers of Sexual Education

On the 4th of March 1949, Swedish gynaecologist, sex educator and activist Karolina Olivia Widerström, died in Stockholm at the age of 93. She was the first official female physician with a university education in her country. Her best-known work was Kvinnohygien (Women’s hygiene), published in 1899, and reprinted until 1932. She was chairman of […]

February 20

Wonder Woman: Feminist Role Model or Male Fantasy?

On the 20th of February 1893, American psychologist Elizabeth Holloway was born on the Isle of Man, subsequently immigrating and growing up in Boston, Massachusetts. Elizabeth and her husband William Moulton Marston – scientist, psychologist and writer, formed a peculiarly creative pair. He ended up making an important scientific discovery when his wife told him […]

February 16

De Sade, Pornography and Women: A Reappraisal by Angela Carter

On the 16th of February 1992, Angela Carter, one of England’s most valuable female writers of picaresque fiction, magical realism and cultural thought, died in London of lung cancer at the age of 51. In her obituary in The Telegraph, she was remembered for “the exuberant fantastic invention, the interest in archetypal fairytale patterns, and […]